Science Café Cleveland—“Quantum Entanglement: How ‘Spooky Action at a Distance’ Led to Quantum Computers and Teleportation”

At the next Science Café Cleveland event, Harsh Mathur, professor of physics, will present “Quantum Entanglement: How ‘Spooky Action at a Distance’ Led to Quantum Computers and Teleportation.”

The talk will be Monday, April 8, from 7 to 8 p.m. at Music Box Supper Club (1148 Main Ave.).

Talk description

Quantum mechanics is the most precisely tested theory in science. Twentieth-century technologies based on quantum mechanics, notably semiconductor electronics and lasers, have changed the way we live. And yet, almost a full century after its initial formulation, quantum mechanics remains a work in progress, and its full technological potential may still not have been realized.

Quantum mechanics is extremely counterintuitive—even to experts.

Albert Einstein described quantum entanglement—one of the main sources of puzzlement—as “spooky action at a distance.”

The past few years have seen remarkable developments in quantum mechanics with new insights, new experiments and potential new applications, such as quantum teleportation and quantum computing.

The old puzzles and paradoxes and the new developments will be the subject of this month’s Science Café Cleveland; no prior knowledge of the subject is required.

Get more information about the event.