New track in the program bridges analytics, technology and business skills

To meet changing market trends with a forward-thinking curriculum, Case Western Reserve University’s Weatherhead School of Management has added a STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) track to its full-time MBA program.

The track, which began in fall 2019, positions the Weatherhead School as one of the first in the U.S. to offer STEM curriculum within an MBA degree.

The academic program focuses on traditional MBA offerings such as management and leadership courses, while also providing in-depth opportunities to learn quantitative skills and their applications, as in data analytics.

The first year of the program builds on core management foundations such as accounting, finance, operations and marketing. In the second year, students customize the curriculum with quantitative-oriented electives, such as blockchain technology, artificial intelligence, and other business technologies electives that fit their career goals.

Manoj Malhotra
Manoj Malhotra

“We are tuned into the evolving market and are preparing our graduates to be the ones to step in and meet the rising demand for leaders who can better make data-driven decisions,” said Manoj Malhotra, dean of the Weatherhead School.

“The STEM MBA program will teach students how to leverage the latest sets of tools and technologies, as well as organize, analyze, interpret, and manage data to support business decisions,” he said. “This approach will help them become even more competitive in the job market, and prepare them to help their businesses thrive.”

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, average salaries for STEM-related jobs are already more than twice as high as others.

Scholars and practitioners teaching in the program include RL Shankar, Alireza Kabirian and Roman Sheremeta— named a Best 40 Under 40 Professor by Poets & Quants.

International students who pursue the STEM MBA become eligible to apply to extend their time in the U.S. after graduation to up to three years.


For more information, contact Daniel Robison at daniel.robison@case.edu.